Working With Children

It is a requirement of the CCYP to monitor and audit compliance of employers and other related bodies with the employment screening requirements of the legislation. The Act establishes strict confidentiality arrangements in relation to all information obtained during the screening process. It is an offence to inappropriately use any information obtained during employment screening. The Act also provides protection from liability or similar claim for any person who provides information in relation to employment screening in good faith and with reasonable care.

Childcare legislation, embodied in the children act 1989, has as its main consideration the welfare of children. It places upon local authority social services department’s statutory duties in relation to children. These duties apply to all children wherever they may be living, e.g. with family, friends, foster care, residential schools, etc. The primary responsibility on the social services department does not diminish the role of other agencies, or the need for inter-agency co-operation in the planning and provision of services for a child or family, which is itself a requirement under section 27 of the act.

The children’s act gives every child protection against abuse and exploitation. What this act is aiming for is to make the child’s welfare the main priority. Obviously there are exceptions to the rule but they try to portray that fact that children are best brought up within their families; it promotes partnership between children, parents and local authorities. The main idea of the children’s act is to protect them; this act was widely supported by the NSPCC.

Before employing anyone in a child care or teaching position, it is a requirement that both the department for education and employment list are consulted. (This would happen as part of the checks in respect of criminal convictions) It should be stressed that the abuse of children in educational establishments is infrequent. Nonetheless, all staff needs to be vigilant about the conduct of others and prudent about their own conduct so that their relationships with children remain and are seen to remain entirely proper and professional.

In the event that a member of staff suspects that a child is being abused by a colleague, the matter should be immediately reported to the head teacher or head of service who will consult with the child with the child protection officer for education. If the head teacher/head of service is the subject of the allegation, the matter should be reported to the chair of governors who will consult with the director of education.

The child protection officer should be consulted regarding any action being taken. If it is felt to be a child protection issue a referral will be made by the headteacher/head of service to the social services department following the ‘response and referral’ section of these procedures. The assistant director (pupil services) and the personnel and staffing officer will be notified of the referral. There is an agreement with other agencies that all complaints received by them will be notified to the local education authority immediately (child protection officer) and subsequently to the headteacher/head of service.

A number of variables, age and standard of players may influence your planning, group size and your coaching experience. Although a teacher in a school will probably not experience coaching with children of all ages at the same time they will experience coaching children of different ability, this is a major consideration when devising a lesson plan. For example the coach may set-up a football lesson for children of 11years old, there maybe county standard football players in a group with people you can hardly kick the ball, the coach needs to challenge the county standard players as well as the beginners.

NEW, enhanced child protection guidelines were this afternoon launched by The Football Association at England’s training headquarters at Burnham Beeches. The new safeguards, drawn up in cooperation with the NSPCC, are designed to stamp out bullying and verbal, physical or sexual abuse, and are aimed at all children playing football, It is hoped that in they will act as the industry-standard throughout sport in this country. “The NSPCC is pleased that The F.A. takes its responsibility to protect children who play football at all levels from harm,” said NSPCC director Jim Harding. “Playing football has enormous health and social benefits for children. However, young people who play football must be protected from abuse or bullying and parents must feel confident that their children are safe.

“Many young footballers build close and trusting relationships with adults in football. This places these adults in an ideal position to listen to children’s concerns and to spot and act on any suspicion or allegation of abuse, in or outside the sport”. Under the new guidelines, The F.A. is committed to establishing, with the help of the NSPCC, a Child Protection Help line so that young footballers have direct access to expert help and advice. This will be run in conjunction with moves by The F.A.’s full-time child protection officer to introduce best practice in reporting and dealing with allegations of all forms of abuse.

As from today, child protection training will also be an integral part of all F.A. coaching, refereeing and medical education courses. “Over half a million adults are involved in organising football in this country,” said F.A. chairmans Geoff Thompson. “Through this initiative it is our stated aim to ensure everybody is better prepared to play their part in the protection of children. “We are committed to developing a culture in which children can play football in a safe and enjoyable environment. We hope this new policy will give the clear message that child abuse has no place in football”.

Children love playing football; that fact is indisputable. The Football Association takes seriously its role as the guardian of the game at all levels in this country – that is why it developed its Child Protection Policy, Procedures and Practices, …

Within health and social care, there are many references to the need for health and social care agencies to ‘work together’ more effectively in ‘partnership’. Evidently, the health and social care sector provides a service for the wellbeing of vulnerable …

Sexual abuse is one of the many issues that have been prevalent in society especially amongst the youth. Victims of sexual abuse choose no gender and age, meaning just about anybody could be victims of this abuse, but today the …

Players at the Foundation level learn the basic movement skills, and have low levels of knowledge and understanding. They are developing positive attitudes to physical activity, and are becoming movement literate. The players normally play at Primary School where it …

Unit 1: Communication skills for working in the health sector Assessment You should use this file to complete your Assessment. How to complete and send your Assessment Save a copy of this document, either onto your computer or USB drive. …

Other schemes that the grass root of FA provide is funding for leagues outside the national league systems. These are the leagues that the majority of all children play in and are the foundation for young talent A big Charity which …

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