Ubiquitous computing

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Hippocrates, the father of medicine, already realized that “the physician must not only be prepared to do what is right himself, but also make the patient … cooperate” Medical compliance – commonly defined as the extent to which a patient conforms to medical advice about lifestyle and dietary changes as well as taking medication as prescribed – remains a challenge more than twenty centuries after Hippocrates. When Sullivan et al. studied the cost of noncompliance with medication regimens in the American health care system; they found that 5.

5% of all hospitalizations they investigated in their study were due to patients not taking their medications as prescribed. Medical science is making continuous progress in discovering and developing more effective and efficient treatment methods and is coming to rely on information technology in general to assist in those treatments Our paper analyzes the application of pervasive computing technologies that can significantly help patients manage their diseases and hence improve patient adherence to medical treatments.

The scenario that we envision is smart medication – e.g. a medication package augmented with pervasive computing technologies – informs the patient about the effectiveness and side effects of the treatment, sends reminders to take the medication, informs relatives of elderly patients about their adherence to the treatment, detects dangerous combinations between different types of medication and alerts users about recalls or expired medication. We also have analyzed about Pilot study that will help out the doctors to look after the patients who are residing in their home from the hospital.

From a technological perspective, we propose that the combination of smart objects and the patient’s mobile phone has a lot of potential in the healthcare domain because the smart objects will benefit from the ubiquitous communication infrastructure, the storage functionality and the familiar user interface the mobile phone provides. INTRODUCTION: Pervasive computing envisions a world of omnipresent but invisible information technology embedded into products and everyday items.

Advances in microelectronics and communications technology have moved the technical vision of ubiquitous computing into the realm of the possible. Early examples of ubiquitous computing in use include processor module integration into identification documents and the integration of transponders into cargo pallets that send ID numbers to a reader automatically. In professional circles, the term Pervasive Computing is used commonly to describe the ubiquitous ICT infrastructure aimed at feasible short and medium-term solutions.

Pervasive computing is viewed less as a discrete field of technology, but rather as an emerging application of information and communications technology that is integrated into the everyday world more than ever before. The goal is to meet the claim of “everything, always, everywhere” for data processing and transmission through the ubiquity of ICT systems. In this paper this technological advancement have been adopted in the medicinal field to serve out the patients. Smart blister pack: Research are going on the design of smart medication packages that monitor consumption and provide additional services to the patient.

In the past inventors developed a prototype of a smart blister pack that monitors the medication consumption unobtrusively, transmits the sensed data continuously to facilitate analysis by medical staff during the treatment and reminds patients when they missed a dose on their mobile phone . By invisibly monitoring the patient adherence and reminding the patient only when she missed a dose, the smart blister pack constitutes another example of Mark Weiser’s vision, where embedded technology will calm our lives by removing the annoyances. SMART BLISTER PACK.

GSM NETWORK TO BACKEND AN OVERVIEW OF PVC IN MEDICINE: HOW IT WORKS: Whenever a mobile phone is in the vicinity of medicine cabinet and provides connectivity, the BTnode in the medicine cabinet synchronizes with this virtual counterpart. Remote queries similar to the ones described in the previous section can now no longer address the smart object, but need to address its virtual counterpart. The application keeps track of the medicine in the cabinet by reading the serial number on the RFID tags with which the folding boxes have been equipped. REMINDER OF MEDICINE SCENARIO.

It uses this serial number as the global key to look up information specific to the type of product as well as information specific to this instance of medication such as the user’s prescription information and the expiry date. The communication link to the backend infrastructure where these data are stored is established whenever the user is in the vicinity of the medicine cabinet with his/her Bluetooth equipped mobile phone. Drug usage is monitored by monitoring the regular ”appearance” and ”disappearance” of an RFID tag as the patient removes the medication from the cabinet and from the read range.

This usage information is also sent via the mobile phone to the virtual counterpart of the folding box in a backend infrastructure. The application reminds the patient to take his/her medicine by programming alarms into the mobile phone according to the prescription information associated with a certain type of medication in the medicine cabinet The prescription information is initially stored with the virtual counterpart and is transmitted to the medicine.

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy Abstract Mobile computing has become a fixture in our everyday lives. As of today, people throughout the world can …

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy Abstract Mobile computing has become a fixture in our everyday lives. As of today, people throughout the world can …

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy Compare and contrast monitoring of patient vital signs using mobile computing technology to in-patient visits to the doctor’s office …

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy Compare and contrast monitoring of patient vital signs using mobile computing technology to in-patient visits to the doctor’s office …

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy However, the system also had certain weaknesses. I do feel that these problems would even exist with the implementation …

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy Connecting Patients and Doctors via Mobile Virtual Visits Shortly after the turn of this century, the implementation of web-based …

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