The changes have on behaviour

When dealing with experimental methods you systematically vary one or more factors in order to see what effects the changes have on behaviour. An experiment is often performed in a laboratory because it’s easier to control the factors which one systematically wishes to vary. The main advantage is that you can draw conclusions. You can’t do that in the other two methods. One disadvantage is the ethical problem.

You can only do experiments that don’t affect the subjects in a negative way. Consider the belief that alcohol is a sexual stimulant, and that a few drinks can lower sexual inhibitions and increase sexual attraction towards someone else. Experimenters made a few decades ago an experiment about how alcohol affect ones sexuality. The researchers created two drinks that people could not separate apart from taste and the bartenders then fooled the costumers.

There were those who thought they were drinking vodka and really drank it, but there were also those who thought they were drinking vodka, but drank tonic. Regarding the non-alcoholic drink there were those who thought they were drinking tonic and did it, but there were also those who thought they were drinking tonic but in fact they were drinking vodka. This might seem a bit confusing. To make it clearer the table below represents the different possibilities.

The researchers now wanted to study how the sexual arousal had changed. When the subjects had been drinking for a while the researchers observed all of them and the collected data are showed in the table below. A pattern observed between two different variables is called a correlation. The correlational approach is commonly used in non-experimental studies, since finding patterns is one of the important ways of increasing our understanding

Behaviourism is a belief that the environment causes and affects our behaviour. The approach accepts determinism and believes that all behaviour can be explained in terms of, behaviour is a direct result of environmental stimuli that can be predicted. Empiricism …

As predicted the children who participated in the experiment chose the toy most relevant to their gender. Previous studies have shown that children, at about aged three become aware of what sex they are (Ruble, 1984). They then learn the …

Also for a substantial minority of the affected children, the problems continue into their adult lives and indeed, some children of problems drinking parents themselves become transmitters of the problems to the next generation. Children whose parents are problem drinkers are …

Human reproductive behaviour is an evolutionary approach as it tries to explain behaviour from the point of view of how it has evolved. Sexual selection is the process in which a species changes over time as a result of the …

An example of the effects of low self-esteem is that “children who have low self-esteem are less likely to put themselves in challenging and new situations. ” (Tassoni, P. 2006 p. 402). This means that children may not accept what …

The cognitive priming explanation suggests that aggressive ideas shown in the media (particularly films) can ‘spark off other aggressive thoughts in memory pathways as proposed by Berkowitz (1984). After a violent film, the viewer is ‘primed’ to respond aggressively because …

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