Pharmacology calculations

?Practice Test for HESI Examination – Pediatric Calculations Dr. Pandya has a pediatric patient with Ewing’s sarcoma who needs to receive Mithracin, a chemotherapeutic agent. The prescribed dosage for this cancer drug is 25 mcg/kg. At the same time, the patient will also be receiving an experimental drug whose adult recommended dosage is 50 mg. If the child’s BSA is 0. 68 m2 and his weight in lbs is 97, how much are you going to give for the cancer drug (in milligrams) and the experimental drug? To answer this particular problem: always remember this conversion: 1 kg = 2.

2 lbs and 1 mg = 1000 micrograms (mcg) To answer the first problem just multiply the patient’s body weight with the dose protocol: Remember: ALMOST ALL DOSE PROTOCOLS ARE IN KILOGRAMS – mcg/kg; units/kg; mg/kg…. so always make sure that your patient’s body weight is converted into kilograms 97 lbs divided by 2. 2 = 44. 1 kg 44. 1 kg X 25 mcg = 1102. 5 or 1103 then divide it into 1000 to convert it into milligrams = 1. 1 mg (FINAL ANSWER) To answer the second problem, there is a formula that you have to follow (pages 671-672 of your Dosage and Calculations book).

x adult dosage = X 50 mg = 20 mg *Note: To avoid confusion, as to when to use this new formula versus just multiplying the body weight with the dose protocol – ALWAYS REMEMBER THE WORD “ THE ADULT DOSAGE” IF YOU SEE THIS WORD THEN USE THE FORMULA ABOVE!!! *Try to answer chapter review exercise items # 70,71, 72, & 73 on pages 692 of your Dosage and Calculations book. Practice Problem 1: Jenna, who is an HIV+ child was seen in the pediatric ER and was diagnosed with herpes simplex encephalitis. The doctor wants to start acyclovir IV every 8 hours.

The recommended dose for this particular type of clinical diagnosis is 250 mcg/m2 and the IV needs to run for at least 60 minutes. The patients BSA is 0. 48 m2. What will the dosage be? Practice Problem 1 (Answer Key) The patient in labor needs to be started on Pitocin drip. There is an available solution strength of 30 units in 1 L of D5W but the nurse added it instead into 0. 5 L of D5LR. She then runs it at 50 mL/hr. How many milliunits/hr is the client receiving? (milliunits or mu; 1 unit = 1000 milliunits).

Please remember this is about 1/3 of the pharmacology exam. It may be beneficial for you to practice calculations and/or review a nursing math book to help prep. You may not have used all the calculation methods recently. Questions may …

Graded Discussion 2. 1: Medication Effects (Study Guide Case Study, p. 18) Greg Wilson, a 65-year-old man, is diagnosed with pneumonia. He has a history of congestive heart failure. His physician has ordered an antibiotic for the pneumonia and he …

Graded Discussion 2.1: Medication Effects (Study Guide Case Study, p. 18) Greg Wilson, a 65-year-old man, is diagnosed with pneumonia. He has a history of congestive heart failure. His physician has ordered an antibiotic for the pneumonia and he takes …

1. A drug, given as a 100-mg single dose, results in a peak plasma concentration of 20 μg/mL. The apparent volume of distribution is (assume a rapid distribution and negligible elimination prior to measuring the peak plasma level): A. 0.5 …

The volume of distribution is 5. 4 to 5. 8 liters/kilogram (13). Tissue distribution studies in rats using radiolabeled Fexofenadine show that it does not cross the blood-brain barrier. The drug’s protein binding is high (at 60 to 70%), predominantly …

Please answer the following case study questions using the knowledge gained in this course. Remember to cite your references in APA format. Answer the questions in complete sentences and spell-check your Assignment. Each question is worth 4 points. Case 1 …

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