Music Therapy

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy

There are many different ways that we benefit from music. Music can inspire better self-esteem, and confidence. It’s a great way to set the mood, and a wonderful tool. Music therapy is the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program (Gram, 2005). Music therapy can reach out to anyone, age, race, gender it doesn’t matter. Children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly with mental health needs can benefit from music therapy.

As well as, those who have developmental and learning disabilities, those who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease and other aging related conditions will benefit from music therapy. Along with substance abuse problems, brain injuries, physical disabilities, and acute and chronic pain even mothers in labor the list is almost endless. Music therapy provides an opportunity for anybody to make a relationship with a trained music therapist where aspects of problems or difficulties can be addressed. The music is not an end in itself but is used as a means to an end (Wall, 2009). Outline INTRODUCTION

Theses statement: What is music therapy? How does music therapy work? Who does music therapy proclaim to help? Why choose music therapy? These are a few questions that I will address through out this research paper I. Music Therapy a. What it is 1. Definition: 2. History: 3. Qualification: BODY I. Who benefits from it b. Children b. Adolescents c. Adult II. Benefits it offers a. Effective relaxation and stress management 1. Journaling 2. Meditation 3. Yoga III. How it works a. Misconceptions b. Techniques IV. Why choose music therapy a. Promote wellness b. Improve communication c. Promote physical rehabilitation

CONCLUSION: With all the ways music affects your body, you can clearly see how music can be used as an effective relaxation and stress management tool, as well as, the many benefits we are able to gain with the use of music. Music therapy….. Look around you, how many times in one day do you hear or see someone enjoying the sound of music, not the movie but the actual music itself. Music has a way of reaching out to many different individuals. There are many different types of music genres each having a different effect on people. There are many different ways that we benefit from music.

What if we mixed the benefits we receive from music and apply that with therapy? We would have music therapy. What is music therapy? How does music therapy work? Who does music therapy proclaim to help? Why choose music therapy? These are a few questions that I will address throughout this research paper. First, let us start with introducing what music therapy is. Music therapy is the clinical and evidence-based use of music interventions to accomplish individualized goals within a therapeutic relationship by a credentialed professional who has completed an approved music therapy program (Gram, 2005).

The idea of music as a healing influence which could affect health and behavior is as least as old as the writings of Aristotle and Plato (Wall, 2009). The 20th century discipline began after World War I and World War II when community musicians of all types, both amateur and professional, went to Veteran’s hospitals around the country to play for thousands of veterans suffering from both physical and emotional trauma from war (Stuckey, 2010). The patients’ notable physical and emotional responses to music led the doctors and nurses to request the hiring of musicians by the hospitals.

It was soon evident that the hospital musicians needed some prior training before entering the facility and so the demand grew for a college curriculum. The first music therapy degree program in the world, founded at Michigan State University in 1944, celebrated its 50th anniversary in 1994. The American Music Therapy Association was founded in 1998 as a union of the National Association for Music Therapy and the American Association for Music therapy (Scott, 2009).

People can obtain a certification once they complete the approved college music therapy curricula and internship and pass the national examination offered by the Board for music therapists. Secondly, who benefits from music therapy? Music therapy can reach out to anyone, age, race, gender it doesn’t matter. Children, adolescents, adults, and the elderly with mental health needs can benefit from music therapy. Those who have developmental and learning disabilities and or those who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease can get great benefits from this type of therapy.

Other aging related conditions along with substance abuse problems, brain injuries, physical disabilities, and acute and chronic pain even mothers in labor can receive some type of benefit from music therapy. One of the most important benefits achieved though music therapy is stress management. Music therapy is a branch of health care designed to aid physical and emotional health through the use of music, either with listening, song writing, performing, exploring lyrics or other activities related to music (Stuckey, 2010).

It’s often found as part of stress management programs or used in conjunction with exercise, and is used in a variety of health care settings, with very good results in both short-term conditions and more serious long-term ones. While music therapy is an emerging field, music itself has many benefits for health and stress management, and can be used in daily life to relieve stress and promote wellness (Stuckey, 2010). People are able to relieve stress in a few different ways. Some people relieve stress by journaling.

Journaling allows people to clarify their thoughts and feelings, thereby gaining valuable self-knowledge. It’s also a good problem-solving tool; oftentimes, one can hash out a problem and come up with solutions more easily on paper. Journaling about traumatic events helps one process them by fully exploring and releasing the emotions involved, and by engaging both hemispheres of the brain in the process, allowing the experience to become fully integrated in one’s mind (Scott, 2009). Journaling isn’t for everyone; some choose to mediate to reach full relaxation.

Throughout the day, when we experience stress, our bodies automatically react in ways that prepare us to fight or run. In some cases of extreme danger, this physical response is helpful. However, a prolonged state of such agitation can cause physical damage to every part of the body. Meditation affects the body in exactly the opposite ways that stress does, restoring the body to a calm state, helping the body to repair it self, and preventing new damage due to the physical effects of stress (Scott, 2010). Along with journaling and meditation yoga is another stress management.

Yoga, which derives its name from the word, “yoke”—to bring together—does just that, bringing together the mind, body and spirit. But whether you use yoga for spiritual transformation or for stress management and physical well being, the benefits are numerous. Virtually everyone can see physical benefits from yoga, and its practice can also give psychological benefits, such as stress reduction and a sense of well being, and spiritual benefits, such as a feeling of connectedness with God or Spirit, or a feeling of transcendence (Scott, 2009).

With music we are able to achieve this stage of relaxation better. We all experience stress from time to time when stress gets to be too much, it can take a toll on our health and wellbeing. That’s why effective stress relievers are essential in restoring inner peace and physical health. Music Therapy may address several needs simultaneously in a positive and exciting medium. It provides learning and motivation that promotes success (Wall, 2010). Furthermore, music therapy can greatly enhance the quality of life of a child, parent, or family member.

Music influences human behavior by affecting the brain and subsequently other bodily structures in ways that are observable, identifiable, measurable, and predictable, thereby providing the necessary foundation for therapeutic applications. Music Therapists use these influences to affect specific behaviors and outcomes (Gram, 2005). Music Therapy is the enhancement of human capabilities through the planned use of musical influences on brain functioning. The brain is the command center and place where all our senses and experience come together to be processed and understood then perceived, expressed or acted on by we humans.

Music provides a predictable, time-oriented and reality-oriented structure while offering opportunities for participation at one’s own level of functioning and ability. Most people, especially children, enjoy music – therefore, music therapy can be the therapy that reinforces all other therapies (Wall, 2010). Music therapy promotes wellness, improves communication, as well as, promotes physical rehabilitation. Music gives us the hope we strive for. Sometimes even the strength we need to over come outrageous obstacles in our path.

Music can inspire better self-esteem, and confidence. It’s a great way to set the mood, and a wonderful tool. With all the ways music affects your body, you can clearly see how music can be used as an effective relaxation and stress management tool, as well as, the many benefits we are able to gain with the use of music. Music therapy provides an opportunity for anybody to make a relationship with a trained music therapist where aspects of problems or difficulties can be addressed. The music is not an end in itself but is used as a means to an end (Wall, 2009). References

Gram, R. , MD. , & White, L. , MD. (2005, April). American music therapy association. In American Music Therapy Association [Fact sheet]. Retrieved April, 2005, from http://musictherapy. org/definition Music is a human phenomenon. It’s the only sensory experience that can activate all areas of the brain at the same time SIMULTANEOUSLY! Find MRI Scan image light up like a Christmas tree. Music Therapy is useful because music triggers whole brain processes and functioning which, directly affect one’s cognitive, emotional, and physical functions and abilities.

With the newest understandings of Neuroplasticity models music therapy should be a core strategy used in all rehabilitation, education and wellness programs. Scott, E. , M. S. (2009, November 22). How and Why Is Music A Good Tool For Health. About. com. Retrieved from http://stress. about. com/? od/? tensiontamers. Research has shown that both your body and mind are effected and influenced through the use of music. The connections between people and music is significant to a healthy standard of living. People are able to gain pleasure from listening and taking part in the group making music.

The stimulus and satisfaction from regular practice and rehearsal, or even the physical energy released from people by both playing and listening influence positive emotions. In a music therapy session there is the potential to become an integrated part of the music, to move aside into a world beyond the verbal and physical. Stuckey, H. L. , Deed. , & Nobel, J. , MD, MPH. (2010, February). The connection between art, healing, and public heath: a Review of current literature. American Journal of Public Heath, (0090-0036), 254-263.

In the early years of the twentieth century music was used in hospitals mainly to boost morale, as a general aid to convalescence and as an entertaining diversion. Physicians invited musicians to play to large groups of patients on the vague assumption that it might activate metabolic functions and relieve mental stress. Listening to music could provide an aesthetic experience of quality and was regarded by many as a very humane way of occupying patients’ time. Anecdotal accounts of music’s inherent worth abound in the early literature on music in medicine.

There seems to have been a general consensus that exposure to music could do nothing but good. Podolsk cites, for example, the case of a schizophrenic musician being administered daily doses of Chopin. Wall, M. , RN. , & Duffy, A. , LSN. (2009, December). The effects of music therapy for older people with dementia [Review of the literature review Music therapy]. The British Nursing (BJN), 19(2), 108-113. Music therapy provides an opportunity for anybody to make a relationship with a trained music therapist where aspects of problems or difficulties can be addressed.

The music is not an end in itself but is used as a means to an end. Any definition of music therapy is not self-evident; it is not as if music therapists are helping people’s music as speech therapists may be helping speech and language development. In music therapy they are trying to make contact with another human being through music. Therapist can observe how clients use the music and how any problems may get in the way of interactive communication. Music therapy is the controlled use of music in the treatment, rehabilitation, education and training of children and adults suffering from physical, mental or emotional disorder

David from Healtheappointments:

Hi there, would you like to get such a paper? How about receiving a customized one? Check it out https://goo.gl/chNgQy