Health Care Policies and Procedures

Access to Care – means that, in a timely manner, an inmate can be seen by a clinician, be given a professional clinical judgment, and receive care that is ordered. (J-A-01) Accounting – the act of recording, summarizing, analyzing, verifying, and reporting medication usage. (J-D-01) Activities of Daily Living – generally refers to ambulation, bathing, dressing, feeding, and toileting. (JC-06) Administering – the act in which a single dose of an identified drug is given to a patient.

(J-D-01) Advance Directives – expressions of an inmate’s wishes as to how future care should be delivered or declined, including decisions that must be made when the inmate is not capable of expressing those wishes. e. g. , Living Wills – which specify what an inmate wants done, Health Care Proxies or Health Care Power of Attorney – which specify who can make decisions for the inmate when the inmate is incapacitated and “Do Not Resuscitate” (DNR) orders – which is an inmate’s specific refusal of certain extraordinary measures that may prolong life.

(J-I-04) Adverse Clinical Event – a serious complication, injury or death caused by medical management or by the patient’s underlying disease or condition. A sizeable proportion of adverse events in the community are the result of human errors. For example, switching two look-alike medications (e. g. , Prozac and Doxipen) is a potentially easy mistake. Giving the wring medication to patients during medication administration rounds is an Adverse Clinical Event. (J-B-02) Aids to Impairment – include, but are not limited

to, eyeglasses, hearing aids, canes, crutches, and wheelchairs. (J-G-10) Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) – electronic devices that interpret cardiac rhythms and, if appropriate, deliver an electrical shock to the patient. (J-E-08) Average Daily Population (ADP) – the average daily inmate population of the jail facility. Basic Continuous Quality Improvement Program – a program that monitors the fundamental aspects of the Facility’s health care system through one Outcome Quality Improvement Study and one Process Quality Improvement Study

(e.g. access to care, the intake process, continuity of care, emergency care and hospitalizations, adverse patient occurrences including all deaths) at least annually. (J-A-06) Basic Orientation – provided on the first day of employment, and includes information necessary for the health staff member to function safely in the institution. At a minimum, this addresses relevant security and health services policies and procedures, response to facility emergency situations, the staff member’s functional position description, and inmate-staff relationships.

(J-C-09) DRAFT Property of CHC CHC Companies include: Confidential and Proprietary Document – Not to be Disseminated Without Written Permission. Copyright 2009 by CHC. DEFINITIONS Page 2 of 12 Chain of Evidence – accounting for the continuous possession of evidence specimen from the time of collection until evidence is introduced into court. (J-B-05) Charge Nurse – a facility nurse designated as the lead nurse in charge of a particular shift. CHC – Correctional Healthcare Companies, Inc.

Chief Medical Officer – a licensed physician designated as the RHA’s chief physician responsible for the clinical oversight of regional and facility physicians, the review and clinical content of the RHA’s policies, procedures and protocols, and other duties as set forth in the Jail Policies and Procedures. CHM – Correctional Healthcare Management, Inc. , – a CHC company. Chronic Clinic – a clinician’s clinic which takes place at specified intervals set forth in the chronic disease program.

(J-G-01) Chronic Disease – an illness or condition that affects an individual’s well-being for an extended interval, usually at least 6 months, and generally is not curable but can be managed to provide optimum functioning within any limitations the condition imposes on the individual. (J-G-01) Chronic Disease Program – incorporates a treatment plan and regular clinic visits (chronic clinics). The clinician monitors the patient’s progress during clinic visits and, when necessary, changes the treatment.

The program also includes patient education for symptom management. (J-G-01) Clinical Encounters – interactions between inmates and Health Care Staff that involve treatment and/or an exchange of confidential information. (J-A-09) Clinical Performance Enhancement – the process of having a health professional’s work reviewed by another professional of at least equal training in the same general discipline, such as the review of the facility’s physicians by the responsible physician.

(J-C-02) Clinical Practice Guidelines – systematically developed, science-based statements designed to assist practitioner and patient wit decisions about appropriate health care for specific clinical circumstances. Clinical practice guidelines are used to assist clinical decision making, assess and assure the quality of care, educate individuals and groups about clinical disease, guide the allocation of health care resources, and reduce the risk of legal liability for negligent care.

(J-G-01) Clinical Protocols – written instructions or guidelines that specify the steps to be taken in evaluating a patient’s health status and providing interventions. They provide a sequence of steps to be taken to evaluate and stabilize the patient until a clinician is contacted and orders are received for further care. (J-E-11) Clinically Ordered Restraint – a therapeutic intervention initiated by medical or mental health staff to use devices designed to safely limit a inmate’s mobility. (J-I-01) CHC Companies include:

DRAFT Property of CHC Confidential and Proprietary Document – Not to be Disseminated Without Written Permission. Copyright 2009 by CHC. DEFINITIONS Page 3 of 12 Clinically Ordered Seclusion – a therapeutic intervention initiated by medical or mental health staff to use rooms designed to safely limit a patient’s mobility. (J-I-01) Clinical Setting – refers to an examination or treatment room appropriately supplied and equipped to address the patient’s health care needs (see J-D-03 Clinic Space, Equipment, and Supplies).

(J-E-07) Clinically Significant Findings – any deviation from the normal that significantly impacts the health, safety, and welfare of the patient. (J-E-4) Clinician’s Clinic – sick call held by physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, dentists, or mental health clinicians. (J-E-07) Comprehensive Continuous Quality Improvement Program – a program that includes a Multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Committee, monitoring of the areas specified in the compliance indicators, and an annual review of the effectiveness of the CQI program itself.

In addition, the program includes two Process Quality Improvement Studies and two Outcome Quality Improvement Studies, and both studies identify areas in need of improvement and effect remedial actions or strategies. (J-A-06) Critiques – of drills or actual events document activities including response time, names and titles of health staff, and the roles and responses of all participants. The critique contains observations of appropriate and inappropriate staff response to the drill.

(J-A-07) Daily – means 7 days a week including holidays. (J-E-07) DEA-Controlled Substances – the medications that come under the jurisdiction of the Federal Controlled Substances Act. (J-D-01) Designated Mental Health Clinician – a psychiatrist, psychologist, or psychiatric social worker who is responsible for clinical mental health issues when mental health services at the facility are under a different authority than the medical services.

(J-A-02) Detoxification – the process by which an individual is gradually withdrawn from a drug or alcohol by the administration of decreasing doses of the drug on which the person is physiologically dependent, of one that is cross-tolerant to it, or of one that medical research has demonstrated to be effective. (J-G-06) Diagnostic Services – include biomedical or imaging services and results that are used to make clinical judgments. Diagnostic Services may be provided by reference laboratories, hospital radiology and laboratory departments, public health agencies, or correctional facilities.

(J-D-04) Discharge Planning – the process of providing sufficient medications and arranging for necessary follow-up health services before the inmate’s release to the community. (J-E-13) CHC Companies include: DRAFT Property of CHC Confidential and Proprietary Document – Not to be Disseminated Without Written Permission. Copyright 2009 by CHC. DEFINITIONS Page 4 of 12 Dispensing – placing one or more doses of a prescribed medication into containers that are correctly labeled to indicate the name of the patient, the contents of the container, and all other vital information.

(J-D-01) Disposal – (a) the destruction of medication on its expiration date or when retention is no longer necessary or suitable (e. g. , upon the discharge of the patient from the facility), or (b) the provision of medication to the former inmate upon discharge from the Facility (in accordance with the continuityof-care principle). (J-D-01) Distribution – the system for delivering, storing, and accounting for medications from the source of supply to the nursing station or point where they are administered to the patient.

(J-D-01) Early Release – the release of an inmate before the end of his or her sentence based upon the inmate’s terminal condition. (J-G-11) Ectoparasites – parasites that live on the skin such as pediculosis and scabies. communicable and may lead to secondary infections. (J-B-01) Emergency Health Care – emergency medical, mental health, and dental health care for an acute illness or an unexpected health need that cannot be deferred until the next scheduled sick call or clinic.

(J-E-08) Error Reporting System – includes policies and procedures that outline how health staff voluntarily identify and report all clinical errors, whether the error occurs by omission (failing to do something that is supposed to be done) or commission (doing something that is not supposed to be done). (J-B02) Evidence Collection Kit – a kit, provided by the Facility and approved by the Responsible Physician (this consists of a DNA collection kit) and the local legal authority, designed to assist in the collection of critical evidence and to standardize proper evidence collection.

(J-B-05) Exposure Control Plan – describes staff actions to be taken to eliminate or minimize exposures to pathogens. (J-B-01) Extreme Isolation – refers to situations in which inmates are seen by staff or other inmates fewer than three times a day. (J-E-09) Facility – the correctional facility at which the RHA provides services. Forced Medications – medications given without an inmate’s consent. (J-I-02) Forensic Information – physical or psychological data collected from an inmate that may be used against them in disciplinary or legal proceedings. (J-I-03) DRAFT Property of CHC They are CHC Companies include:

Confidential and Proprietary Document – Not to be Disseminated Without Written Permission. Copyright 2009 by CHC. DEFINITIONS Page 5 of 12 Health Assessment – the process whereby an individual’s health status is evaluated, including questioning the patient about symptoms. (J-E-4) Health Care – the sum of all actions, preventive and therapeutic, taken for the physical and mental well-being of a population. Health Care includes medical, dental, mental health, nutrition, and other ancillary services, as well as maintaining clean and safe environmental conditions.

(J-A-02) Health Care Liaison – may be Security Staff member or other person without a health care license who is trained by the Responsible Physician in limited aspects of health care coordination and generally caries out the following duties: reviewing receiving screening forms for follow-up attention; triaging non-emergency sick call requests every 24 hours; facilitating sick call by having inmates and records available for the health care professional; and helping to carry out clinicians’ orders regarding such matters as diet, housing, and work assignments.

(J-C-08) Health Care Staff – all qualified health care professionals as well as administrative and support staff (e. g. , medical record administrators, laboratory technicians, nursing and medical assistants, clerical workers). (J-A-03) Health Education – information on preventing disease and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. (J-F-01) Health Services Administrator (HSA)/Site Supervisor – a person who by virtue of education, experience, or certification is capable of assuming responsibility for arranging all levels of health care and ensuring quality and accessible health services for inmates.

(J-A-02) Hospice Program – delivers palliative care (medical care and support services aimed at providing comfort. ) Treatment is focused on symptom control and quality-of-life issues rather than attempting to cure conditions. (J-G-11) HPL – Health Professionals, Ltd. – a CHC company. In-depth Orientation – includes a full familiarization with the health services delivery system at the Facility, and focuses on the similarities as well as the differences between providing health care in the community and in a correctional setting.

At a minimum this includes all health services policies and procedures not addressed in the basic orientation, health and age-specific needs of the inmate population, infection control including use of standard precautions, and confidentiality of records and health information. (J-C-09) Independent Review – the assessment of a health care professional’s compliance with disciplinespecific and community standards. The review includes an analysis of trends in a practitioner’s clinical practice.

This review may be conducted by someone who may or may not be directly employed by the RHA, as long as the reviewing practitioner has not been previously involved in the care of the patient(s) involved. (J-C-02) CHC Companies include: DRAFT Property of CHC Confidential and Proprietary Document – Not to be Disseminated Without Written Permission. Copyright 2009 by CHC. DEFINITIONS Page 6 of 12 Infection Control – practices defined by the American Dental Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as including sterilizing instruments, disinfecting equipment, and properly disposing of hazardous waste.

(J-E-06) Infirmary – an area in the facility accommodating patients for a period of 24 hours or more, expressly set up and operated for the purpose of caring for patients who need skilled nursing care but do not need hospitalization or placement in a licensed nursing facility, and whose care cannot be managed safely in an outpatient setting. It is not the area itself but the scope of care provided that makes the bed an infirmary bed. (J-G-03)

Infirmary care – care provided to inmates with an illness or diagnosis that requires daily monitoring, medication and/or therapy, or assistance with activities of daily living at a level needing skilled nursing intervention. (J-G-03) Informed Consent – the agreement by an inmate to a treatment, examination, or procedure after the inmate receives the material facts about the nature, consequences, and risks of the proposed treatment, examination, or procedure; the alternatives to the proposed action; and the prognosis if the proposed action is not undertaken.

(J-I-05) Inmate – an individual held in the custody of the facility. Inmate-on-Inmate Sexual Abuse – Encompasses all incidents of inmate-on-inmate sexually abusive contact and inmate-on-inmate sexually abusive penetration. (J-B-04) Inmate-on-inmate sexually abusive contacts – Touching (either directly or through the clothing, of the genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks) without penetration by an inmate of another inmate without the latter’s consent, or with an inmate who is coerced into sexual contact by threats of violence, or with an inmate who is unable to consent or refuse.

(J-B-04) Inmate-on-Inmate Sexually Abusive Penetration – Penetration by an inmate of another inmate without the latter’s consent, or with an inmate who is coerced into sexually abusive penetration by threats of violence, or with an inmate who is unable to consent or refuse. The sexual acts included are as follows: • • • Contact between the penis and the vagina or the anus; or Contact between the mouth and the penis, vagina, or anus; or Penetration of the anal or genital opening of another person by a hand, finger, or other object. (J-B-04) DRAFT Property of CHC

CHC Companies include: Confidential and Proprietary Document – Not to be Disseminated Without Written Permission. Copyright 2009 by CHC. DEFINITIONS Page 7 of 12 Intrasystem Transfers – include inmates being transferred from one facility to another within the same correctional authority’s system, individuals returning from furlough, or any individuals brought to the Facility with an already established health record for their current incarceration from a different correctional system. (J-E-3) Jail Administration – Upper level administrative staff at the facility (e. g.

, Jail Commander, Sheriff) (JA-03) Jail Policy and Procedure Manual Mass Casualty Drill – a simulated emergency involving multiple casualties that require triage by Health Care Staff. It may involve a natural disaster (e. g. , tornado, flood, earthquake), an internal disaster (e. g. , riot, arson, kitchen explosion), or external disaster (e. g. , mass arrests, bomb threat, power outage). (J-A-07) Man-Down Drill – a simulated emergency affecting one individual who needs immediate medical intervention. It involves life-threatening situations commonly experienced in correctional settings.

(JA-07) Medical Clearance – a clinical assessment of physical and mental status before an individual is admitted into the facility. Individuals who may be too ill to wait for routine screening or be admitted to the Facility are identified. The medical clearance may come from on-site Health Care Staff or may require sending the individuals to the local hospital emergency room. (J-E-2) Medical Isolation – housing in a separate room with a separate toilet, hand washing facility, soap, single-service towels, and with appropriate accommodations for showering.

(J-B-01) Medication List – a written list of prescription and nonprescription medications that are ordinarily available to authorized prescribers, including consultants, working for the Facility. (J-D-01) Mental Health Services – include the use of a variety of psychosocial and pharmacological therapies, either individual or group, including biological, psychological, and social, to alleviate symptoms, attain appropriate functioning, and prevent relapse.

(J-G-04) Mental Health Staff – includes qualified health care professionals who have received instruction and supervision in identifying and interacting with individuals in need of mental health issues. (J-E-05) Multidisciplinary Quality Improvement Committee – a group of health care staff from various disciplines (e. g. , medicine, nursing, mental health, dentistry, health records, pharmacy, laboratory) that designs quality improvement monitoring activities, discusses the results, and implements corrective action. (J-A-06)

DRAFT Property of CHC CHC Companies include: Confidential and Proprietary Document – Not to be Disseminated Without Written Permission. Copyright 2009 by CHC. DEFINITIONS Page 8 of 12 National Clinical Practice Guidelines – those presented by national professional organizations and accepted by experts in the respective medical field. (J-G-01) Near-Miss Clinical Event – an error in clinical activity without a consequential adverse patient outcome. For example, a wrong drug is dispensed but not administered to a patient.

(J-B-02) Observation Beds – beds designed for medical or mental observation for specific purposes, such as watching the inmate’s response to a change in medication regimen. Inmates can also be placed in observation beds to prevent them from eating or drinking before a medical test that requires such restriction, to allow inmates to recover from day surgeries or medical procedures, or to watch the general behavior of inmates whose mental stability appears questionable. (J-G-03) Opiates – any preparation or derivative of opium, as well as opioid, a synthetic narcotic that resembles an opiate in action but is not derived from opium.

(J-G-06) Oral Care – includes instruction in oral hygiene, examination, and treatment of dental problems. Instruction in oral hygiene minimally includes information on plaque control and the proper brushing of teeth. (J-E-06) Oral Examination – is performed by a dentist and includes taking or reviewing the patient’s oral history, an extraoral head and neck examination, charting of teeth, and examination of the hard and soft tissue of the oral cavity with a mouth mirror, explorer and adequate illumination.

(J-E-06) Oral Screening – includes visual observation of the teeth and gums, and notation of any obvious or gross abnormalities requiring immediate referral to a dentist. (J-E-06) Oral Treatment – includes the full range of services that in the supervising dentist’s judgment are necessary for proper mastication and maintaining the inmate’s health status. (J-E-06) Orthoses – specialized mechanical devices, such as braces, foot inserts, or hand splints, used to support or supplement weakened or abnormal joints or limbs. (J-G-10) Outcome Quality Improvement Study – an examination of whether expected outcomes of patient care were achieved.

(J-A-06) Patient Safety Systems – practice interventions designed to prevent adverse or near-miss clinical events. For example, during administration of medications, use of a photo identification system helps to ensure that the right person receives the right drug. (J-B-02) Physical Examination – an objective, hands-on evaluation of an individual. It involves the inspection, palpation, auscultation, and percussion of a patient’s body to determine the presence or absence of physical signs of disease. (J-E-4) Policy – an official position on a particular issue related to an organization’s operations.

(J-A-05) CHC Companies include: DRAFT Property of CHC Confidential and Proprietary Document – Not to be Disseminated Without Written Permission. Copyright 2009 by CHC. DEFINITIONS Page 9 of 12 Post – is a job defined by its location, time, and duties that can be filled interchangeably by different staff members (e. g. , 7-3 infirmary nurse). Continuous coverage usually distinguishes a post from a position; a post has tasks that cannot usually be deferred. (J-C-07) Position – is a job filled by a specific staff member (e. g. , medical records secretary, physician, chief nurse).

A position has tasks that can usually be deferred until the staff member is available. (J-C-07) Potentially Suicidal – an inmate that is not actively suicidal but expresses suicidal ideation and/or has a recent history of self-destructive behavior. They should be observed at staggered intervals not to exceed every 15 minutes (e. g. , 5, 10, 7 minutes). (J-G-05) Preferred Primary Care Clinicians – all licensed practitioners providing the facility’s primary care including medical physicians, psychiatrists, dentists, midlevel practitioners (i. e. , nurse practitioners, physician assistants), and PhD-level psychologists.

(J-C-02) Prescribing Clinician – a licensed individual, such as an MD, DO, NP, or PA, authorized to write prescriptions. (J-C-07) Primary Care – according to the National Academy of Sciences’ Institute of Medicine, is the provision of integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (J-C-02) Process Quality Improvement Study – a study that examines the effectiveness of the health care delivery process.

(J-A-06) Procuring – the act of ordering medications for the facility. (J-D-01) Procedure – a detailed description of how a policy is to be carried out. (J-A-05) DRAFT Property of CHC Prostheses – artificial devices to replace missing body parts such as limbs, teeth, eyes, or heart valves. (J-G-10) Qualified Health Care Professional – includes physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, dentists, mental health professionals, and others who by virtue of their education, credentials, and experience are permitted by law to evaluate and care for patients. (J-A-02)

Qualified Mental Health Professional – includes psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric social workers, psychiatric nurses, and others who by virtue of their education, credentials, and experience are permitted by law to evaluate and care for the mental health needs of patients. (J-E-05) CHC Companies include: Confidential and Proprietary Document – Not to be Disseminated Without Written Permission. Copyright 2009 by CHC.

DEFINITIONS Page 10 of 12 Receiving Screening – a process of structured inquiry and observation designed to prevent newly arrived inmates who pose a threat to their own or others’ health or safety from being admitted to the Facility’s general population.

It is intended to identify potential emergency situations among new arrivals and to ensure that patients with known illnesses and currently on medications are identified for further assessment and continued treatment. It should be conducted as soon as possible upon the inmate arriving at the Facility. Under normal circumstances, inmates should not be released from the from the intake/booking area until the receiving screening is completed. (J-E-2) Request for Health Care – refers to an oral or written petition for medical, dental, or mental health services. (J-E-07) Responsible Physician – a designated M.

D. or D. O. who has the final authority at a given Facility regarding clinical issues. (J-A-02) Responsible Health Authority – (RHA) – the designated health authority responsible for health services at a particular facility, either HPL or CHM. (J-A-02) Restricted Licenses – licenses that have attached stipulations that must be followed. Different state licensing boards refer to these modified licenses by various names including temporary, probation, stipulated order or agreement, practice restriction, institutional, restricted, disciplinary, provisional, limited, and conditional.

(J-C-01) Security Staff – includes line security staff at the facility as well as the Jail Administration. (J-A-03) Self-Care – care for a condition that can be treated by the inmate and may include over-the-counter medications. (J-F-01) Self-Medication Programs – (also known as keep-on-person programs) permit responsible inmates to carry and administer their own medications. (J-D-02) Segregated Inmate – those inmates isolated from the general population and who receive services and activities apart from other inmates.

The living and confinement conditions define the segregated status, not the reason an inmate was placed in segregation. (J-E-09) Sexual Abuse – Encompasses (1) inmate-on-inmate sexual abuse, (2) staff-on-inmate sexual abuse, and (3) staff-on-inmate sexual harassment. (J-B-04) Sexual Assault – includes the definitions of: (1) Inmate-on-inmate Sexually Abusive Penetration, or (2) Staff-on-inmate Sexually Abusive Penetration. (J-B-05) Sheltered Housing – as opposed to infirmary or observation beds, provides a protective environment that does not require 24-hour nursing care.

The beds can be in the infirmary itself or in other designated areas. (J-G-03) CHC Companies include: DRAFT Property of CHC Confidential and Proprietary Document – Not to be Disseminated Without Written Permission. Copyright 2009 by CHC. DEFINITIONS Page 11 of 12 Sick Call – is the evaluation and treatment of an ambulatory patient in a clinical setting, either on or off site, by a qualified health care professional. (J-E-07)

Special Needs Inmates – inmates with health conditions that require regular care, including, but not limited to, inmates that are chronically ill, inmates with communicable diseases, physically disabled inmates, pregnant inmates, adolescent inmates, terminally ill inmates, frail or elderly inmates, inmates with serious mental health needs and developmentally disabled inmates. (J-G-02) Specialty Care – specialist-provided health care (e. g. , surgery, obstetric, gynecology, dermatology, orthopedics). (J-D-05) Staff-on-Inmate Indecent Exposure – The display by a staff member of his or her genitalia, buttocks, or breast in the presence of an inmate.

(J-B-04) Staff-on-Inmate Voyeurism – An invasion of an inmate’s privacy by staff unrelated to official duties, such as peering at an inmate who is showering or undressing in his or her cell or requiring an inmate to expose him or herself for reasons unrelated to official duties. (J-B-04) Staff-on-Inmate Sexual Abuse – Encompasses all occurrences of staff-on-inmate sexually abusive contact, staff-on-inmate sexually abusive penetration, staff-on-inmate indecent exposure, and staff-oninmate voyeurism. Staff solicitations of inmates to engage in sexual contact or penetration constitute attempted staff-on-inmate sexual abuse.

(J-B-04) Staff-on-Inmate Sexual Harassment – Repeated verbal statements or comments of a sexual nature to an inmate by a staff member. Such statements include demeaning references to gender, derogatory comments about body or clothing, or profane or obscene language or gestures. (J-B-04) Staff-on-Inmate Sexually Abusive Contact – Touching without penetration by a staff member of an inmate with or without his or her consent, either directly or through the clothing, of the genitalia, anus, groin, breast, inner thigh, or buttocks.

(J-B-04) Staff-on-Inmate Sexually Abusive Penetration – Penetration by a staff member of an inmate with or without his or her consent. The sexual acts included are as follows: • • • Contact between the penis and the vagina or the anus; or Contact between the mouth and the penis, vagina, or anus; or Penetration of the anal or genital opening of another person by a hand, finger, or other object. (J-B-04) DRAFT Property of CHC Staff Safety – refers to the health and well-being of health care staff who work in the facility. It is directly related to the administrative practice that assures public safety of the facility. (J-B-03)

CHC Companies include: Confidential and Proprietary Document – Not to be Disseminated Without Written Permission. Copyright 2009 by CHC. DEFINITIONS Page 12 of 12 Staffing Plan – lays out the full-time equivalent (FTE) staff coverage required, lists current incumbents and vacancies, and addresses how full coverage will be accomplished if all positions are not filled. A staffing plan is a detained schedule on which classifications of staff are assigned to posts and positions for the health care unit.

(J-C-07) Standard Precautions – combines the major features of universal precautions (designed to reduce the risk of transmission of bloodborne pathogens) and body secretion isolation (designed to reduce the transmission of pathogens from moist body substances), and apply them to all patients receiving care, regardless of their diagnosis or presumed infection status. (J-B-01) Standing Orders – written orders that specify the same course of treatment for each patient suspected of having a given condition, and that specify the use and amount of prescription drugs.

(J-E11) Tabletop Exercises – discussions about health care staff’s projected response to emergencies. (J-A07) Terminally Ill – an inmate whose physical condition has deteriorated to the point where the prognosis is less than a year to live. (J-G-11) Treatment plan – a series of written statements specifying a patient’s particular course of therapy and the roles of qualified health care professionals in carrying it out. (J-G-02) Triage – the sorting and classifying of inmates’ health requests to determine priority of need and the proper place for health care to be rendered.

(J-E-07) Violent Behavior – either expressive violence initiated as a result of an interpersonal altercation where the goal is to injure the other person, or as instrumental violence where the goal is to get something from the person (usually the result of criminal intent). An understanding of the history of either form of violence and the circumstances leading to the specific behavior is helpful in assessing the patient’s potential for further viole.

Of the countries that were made available, the three countries health care policies I found most interesting were United Kingdom, Japan and Taiwan. These three countries all had a very different take on how to provide healthcare to the public …

Prisons have a great amount of mentally ill inmates and there is a risk that other inmates could developmental disabilities as well. The increase of mentally ill inmates in the prisons is because they are in danger to the public …

Essays on Health Care Any prisoner has a right to access medical services, a provision under the eighth Amendment of the United States Constitution. The prison health care works towards the prevention, treatment, and management of illness in order to …

Acute care is medical treatment at a hospital which is short-term. Acute care is a level of health care in which a patient is treated for a brief but severe episode of illness, for conditions that are the result of …

Acute care is medical treatment at a hospital which is short-term. Acute care is a level of health care in which a patient is treated for a brief but severe episode of illness, for conditions that are the result of …

According to Sanchez (2005), most of the prisons in America fail to offer quality services due to lack of adequate and well trained staff that can provide medical services especially to the chronically ill patients, lack of specialists to treat …

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