Camouflage Makeup for Atrophic, Hypertrophic and Keloid Scar Tissue

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Atrophic scars look like small dents or pits in the skin. They are normally an unusual shape, and tend to be jagged around the edges. A common, and the most likely, cause for people to have this type of scar will be due to having acne or chicken pox prior to scarring. They can occur anywhere on the body, but facial atrophic scars are what most people choose to have treated or covered with the use of camouflage creams. Atrophic scars are caused by the underlying tissues beneath the scar, such as fat, collagen and muscle. If these structures sustain damage, it is likely an atrophic scar will form, as the skin reacts to loss of or damage to the tissue beneath. How to camouflage atrophic scar tissue:

  1. Cleanse the area you wish to camouflage, using suitable cleanser selected for the specific skin type
  2. Tone the area using the selected toner for the specific skin type
  3. Gently blot the area with a tissue
  4. Moisturise the area with a moisturiser suited to the skin type
  5. Gently blot the area with a tissue.
  6. Use suitable corrective colour camouflage cream to cancel out the undertone colour of the scar in accordance to colour theory
  7. Set with camouflage powder or setting spray
  8. Apply another layer of corrective colour if needed
  9. Set with camouflage powder or setting spray
  10. Apply a skin match on top of the layers of corrective camouflage creams and powder
  11. Set with camouflage powder or setting spray
  12. Apply another layer of skin match if required
  13. Set with camouflage powder or setting spray.
  14. Apply highlighter to the outline/rim of the scar and create a line through the middle of the scar using the highlighter to create a raised illusion to the scar as the actual sunken skin cannot be corrected with the use of camouflage creams.
  15. Set with a setting spray. Hypertrophic Scar Tissue Hypertrophic scars are raised and often a darker colour than the surrounding skin. Hypertrophic scars can feel itchy, be very noticeable and can cause problems with tightness and mobility of the skin. Over time these scars are likely to get better, often lessening in height and lightening in colour.

However, sometimes this does not occur and you may need to seek help in making their appearance reduced. They ought to show some improvement in appearance after a year, and if they do not so then they may need to be examined to determine if they are keloid scars or not. Hypertrophic scars are most common after burn injuries, but they cannot be completely predicted. A hypertrophic scar could occur after any wound, especially if you are susceptible to them. Hypertrophic scars occur due to an over-production of collagen when the scar is being formed.

It may take up to two months for a hypertrophic scar to start to emerge, and they may continue to appear worse over the next six months. The reason for the reddened colour is due to your body trying to get as much blood to the area in order for it to heal well. This creates many new blood vessels, and can mean that too much blood is carried there leading to a change in colour. How to camouflage hypertrophic scar tissue:

  1. Cleanse the area you wish to camouflage, using suitable cleanser selected for the specific skin type
  2. Tone the area using the selected toner for the specific skin type
  3. Gently blot the area with a tissue.
  4. Moisturise the area with a moisturiser suited to the skin type
  5. Gently blot the area with a tissue
  6. Use suitable corrective colour camouflage cream to cancel out the undertone colour of the scar in accordance to colour theory
  7. Set with camouflage powder or setting spray
  8. Apply another layer of corrective colour if needed
  9. Set with camouflage powder or setting spray
  10. Apply a skin match on top of the layers of corrective camouflage creams and powder
  11. Set with camouflage powder or setting spray
  12. Apply another layer of skin match if required
  13. Set with camouflage powder or setting spray
  14. Apply shader to the outline/rim of the scar and create a line through the middle of the scar using the shader to create a sunken/less raised illusion to the scar as the actual raised skin cannot be corrected with the use of camouflage creams.
  15. Set with a setting spray. Keloid Scar Tissue Keloids are generally very large, red in colour and start to invade the skin around the wound, growing into the healthy skin. They can be distinguished from hypertrophic scars because they continue to grow beyond where the wound is, spreading to the skin surrounding the wound.

A keloid scar is generally not diagnosed for about a year after the wound has healed, they might take a while to form and can look like a hypertrophic scar at first. Also alike to a hypertrophic scar, they can cause you some discomfort or pain. Keloid scars are not very common, but there are certain times when they are more likely to form. The development of keloid scars can be seen to be hereditary; you are at a much higher risk of this form of scarring if your direct family has experienced it.

People with dark skin tones are more likely to experience keloid scarring, as well are young people. Keloid scars occur when your body continues to produce collagen to heal the wound after the scar has formed. This means that the scar tissue continues to grow, eventually leading it to invade the surrounding skin. The reddened colour is due to the increased amount of blood being taken to the area in order for it to continue to heal, even after the wound has already been closed and the scar formed over the wound. How to camouflage Keloid scar tissue:

  1. Cleanse the area you wish to camouflage, using suitable cleanser selected for the specific skin type
  2. Tone the area using the selected toner for the specific skin type
  3. Gently blot the area with a tissue
  4. Moisturise the area with a moisturiser suited to the skin type
  5. Gently blot the area with a tissue
  6. Use suitable corrective colour camouflage cream to cancel out the undertone colour of the scar in accordance to colour theory
  7. Set with camouflage powder or setting spray
  8. Apply another layer of corrective colour if needed.
  9. Set with camouflage powder or setting spray
  10. Apply a skin match on top of the layers of corrective camouflage creams and powder
  11. Set with camouflage powder or setting spray
  12. Apply another layer of skin match if required
  13. Set with camouflage powder or setting spray
  14. Apply shader to the outline/rim of the scar and create a line through the middle of the scar using the shader to create a sunken/less raised illusion to the scar as the actual raised skin cannot be corrected with the use of camouflage creams.
  15. Set with a setting spray.

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