Behavior of gases

Introduction: First of all, the Boyle’s law (pressure-volume law) indicates that the volume of a certain amount of gas given held at a constant temperature differentiates inversely with the applied pressure when there are constant temperature and mass. Equations: PV=C. When pressure goes up, volume goes down (derived from the equation above): P1V1 = P2V2 = P3V3. Furthermore, this particular equation dictates that the product of the initial volume and pressure is equal to the product of the volume and pressure after a change under constant temperature. On the other hand.

Charles’ law states that the volume of a given amount of gas held at a constant pressure is considered directly proportional to the Kelvin temperature. Equations: V T or V / T = C. Therefore, as the volume rises, the temperature goes up, as well, and vice versa. Same as the Boyle’s law, initial and final volumes, and temperatures under constant pressure can be calculated also. V1 / T1 = V2 / T2 = V3 / T3. Last but not least, the Gay-Lussac’s law emphasizes that the pressure of a given amount of gas held at a constant volume is said to be directly proportional to the Kelvin temperature.

Equations: P T. As the pressure rises, the temperature also rises, vice versa. Like the other gas laws mentioned above, this law’s initial, final volumes, and temperatures under constant pressure can also be calculated. Meanwhile, temperature is the measurement of the kinetic energy of particles inside of a certain object. Thus, the object will increase in temperature if particles have a high amount of kinetic energy. Meanwhile, the object will decrease in temperature if the particles have less kinetic energy.

Nonetheless, an object with the lowest temperature tends to have particlesthat are not moving at all. Last but not least, this particular temperature depicts absolute zero, it is zero Kelvin (SI unit for temperature), and -273 C°. Procedure: (Part I: Pressure and Volume) Place the piston of a plastic 20 mL syringe at 10 mL. Connect the following syringe to the valve of the Gas Pressure Sensor Then, attach the Gas Pressure Sensor to LabQuest and choose the “New” option under the File menu Next, prepare the data-collection mode(Change the mode to Events with Entry)(Enter Name(Volume) and Units(mL), then select OK) Start data collection.

When the pressure reading is steady, select Keep and enter in the volume in mL, then press OK for the data pair to be stored. Collect at least 10 data points by pressing the syringe(decreasing the volume) and pulling the syringe out(increasing the volume) After finishing the collecting of data, view a graph of pressure vs. volume, and then record the results on the lab notebook. (Part II: Pressure and Temperature).

Attach the Temperature Probe to Channel 2 of LabQuest. Choose New under the File menu Attach the parts of the apparatus, and then ensure all fittings are airtight.

Also, make sure that the rubber stopper and flask neck are dry, then twist and slightly push hard on the rubber stopper for ensuring a tight fit Prepare water baths in flasks/beakers, ranging from ice water to hot water Immediately change the graph settings for the pressure vs. temperature graph to be displayed Record the data obtained in the notebook (Part III) Set up the LabQuest as the instructions in the box says so(Connect the Temperature Probe to 1 / 3 Channel 2) Set up cooling baths for the following experiments Connect the rubber stopper to the flask, ensuring fittings are airtight, then put the temperature probe’s tip in the 125 mL.

Erlenmeyer flask with the dry ice to measure the temperature of the liquid/substances(Ethanol and Ethylene glycol)with their respective varying % contents Change the graph settings to display a graph of pressure vs. temperature Observations: Results: Pressure (kPa) Volume(mL) 100. 66 20 111. 65 18 121. 41 16 136. 27 14 148. 50 12 159. 30 10 169. 32 8 178. 24 6 184. 87 4 197. 51 2 Temperature(°C, K) Pressure(kPa) 23. 1, 296. 25 101. 17 30. 4, 303. 55 101. 22 40. 5, 313. 65 101. 29 50. 2, 323. 35 101. 30 59. 5, 332. 65 101. 38 80. 5, 353. 65 101. 44.

100, 373. 15 103. 43 Cooling Agent Antifreeze (Ethyleneglycol) 95% Ethyl Alcohol (ethanol) Water (mL) Temp (°C, K) Pressure (kPa) Ice 0% 0% 150 -265. 2, 7. 95 0 Dry Ice 0% 100% 0 -57. 6, 215. 55 85. 05 Dry Ice 25% 75% 0 -51. 3, 221. 85 87. 08 Dry Ice 50% 50% 25 -43. 40, 230. 35 88. 16 Dry Ice 75% 25% 50 -35. 4, 237. 75 101. 4 Room Temp. 23. 1, 296. 25 101. 17 100° 373. 15 103. 43 Determination of Absolute Zero Accuracy Temperature °C Absolute Value % Error Accepted Value -265. 2 538. 35 197 % 273. 15 ° C -57. 6 330. 75 121% 273. 15 ° C -51. 3 324. 45 118% 273. 15 ° C -43. 40 316.

55 84% 273. 15 ° C -35. 4 308. 55 112% 273. 15 ° C 23. 1 250. 05 91% 273. 15 ° C 2 / 3 100 173. 15 63% 273. 15 ° C The first result shows as the pressure goes up, the volume goes down, as perceived in Boyle’s law. Meanwhile, the second result indicates that the higher the temperature, the pressure also rises, which confirms the Gay-Lussac’s law. Furthermore, in order to find the absolute zero, this particular equation must be used: y=mx+b(. 98(0)+-265. 2). Thus, y=absolute zero. Therefore, absolute zero is at -265. 2.

Discussion: Conclusion: POWERED BY TCPDF (WWW. TCPDF. ORG).

Introduction: First of all, the Boyle’s law (pressure-volume law) indicates that the volume of a certain amount of gas given held at a constant temperature differentiates inversely with the applied pressure when there are constant temperature and mass. Equations: PV=C. …

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Introduction The purpose of this experiment is to test Charles’ law by finding the relationship between the volume of a gas and its temperature. Charles’ law states: “at constant pressure, the volume of a particular sample of gas is directly …

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