Assignment on Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy

 

 

Unit 7 Assignment Worksheet
Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy: Module 2: Object Relations Therapy, Clip B (Elaborating on Themes and Legacies)
A. Identify 8–10 interviewing-type questions you would want to ask the client.

 

1. Would you want to tell me about that experience?

Rationale: During the interview, the client gave an automatic YES response when asked if he had a legacy of feeling that he had been screwed-up. I believe that I would get hold of the information on the particular event the client was thinking of at that moment if I immediately ask about the experience instead of letting him think of the time in his life the particular event had happened.

 

2. A good wiseass at certain points. What do you exactly mean by this?

Rationale: I would like to ask this as clarification statement to ensure that my interpretation of what the client has just said is the same with what he exactly meant. It is also intended to probe since the client mentioned that he had been a pretty good wiseass at “certain points”.

 

3. You are easy to make fun with?

Rationale: This question is meant to probe on why the client mentioned that he was easy to make fun with. By knowing his response, I could get a better grasp of his thoughts and inner feelings.

 

4. How important is it for you to be able to attend these meetings?

Rationale: During the interview, the client mentioned that going to meetings helped him maintain his sobriety. I just wanted to ensure through this question that he is doing this because he personally wanted to and that he was convinced that going there could really help him cope.

 

5. What made you say you still sound sick right now?

Rationale: By asking this statement, I could assess the client on how conscious he is of his current state and how he feels about the situation.

 

6. Did you mean you feel better right now?

Rationale: This is to clarify what the client meant when he said that he felt he is on the upswing.

7. What made you feel better?

 

Rationale: This is to have a grasp of the things or events that made the client feel better. Almost throughout the interview, he felt so hard on himself so it would be good to note what made him feel a bit better.

 

8. What stuffs are you referring to?

Rationale: This is to know the client’s current concerns. He has many issues so it would be better to know what things are bothering him right now to help him address the problem.

 

B. Identify two interviewing-type questions you would ask the client regarding their thoughts about harming self or others.

 

1. I have noticed that you are rather hard on yourself. Was there ever a time wherein you tried harming yourself?

Rationale: This is to know the client’s history, if any, of inflicting self pain to be able to assess the severity of the situation.

2. You have mentioned that you and your roommate got into a big wresting fight. Is it natural of you to physically fight back if someone picks at you?

Rationale: This is to know the client’s tendencies if ever he feels emotionally upset or disgusted.

 

C. Identify four statements you would make to this particular client regarding ethics. You should specifically address confidentiality and dual relationships. The final two statements could focus on other potential ethical concerns that would be relevant to your client.

 

1. Before we will start this session, I would want to request you to consider me as a friend. You can tell me anything. You can share to me whatever it is that you can think of along the process and whatever it is that you are feeling. Can I Count on you with that matter?

 

Rationale: This is to let the client know that I, as a therapist, am not there to judge him. Rather, I’m there to help him and that is the message that I want to convey to him before the start of the session. Therapists need to communicate a caring, respectful, positive attitude that serves to affirm a client’s basic sense of worth (cited in Farber and Lane, 2002).

 

 

2. I also would want to assure you that whatever will transpire here will be kept confidential and will solely be used to help you.

 

Rationale: This is basically to assure the client that his secrets are safe with me as his therapist, and that all I care for his is wellness.

 

3. In addition, as part of the protocol, here is a written disclosure statement that you need to read on and accomplish, to let you know of our institution’s privacy policies.

 

Rationale: This is to educate the client of the privacy policies before the session starts. It is important to present this at the start of the interview to avoid making the client feel a sense of betrayal in case there’s a need to disclose the information being relayed to the therapist as required by law (cited in Glosoff, Herlihy, & Spence, 2000).

 

4. Along the process, we might become very good friends. Please don’t be offended if I would need to beg off sometimes on your requests, depending on the situation, as these are purely meant for your own good as a client, and not for anything else. I will do my best help you go through with whatever it is that you are into right now.

 

Rationale: This is basically intended to make the client feel that I am after for his welfare and that I am there to help him.

 

Reference:

 

Cormier, S., & Hackney, H. (2008). Counseling Strategies and Interventions (7th ed.). Boston MA: Allyn and Bacon

 

 
Unit 7 – Assignment Worksheet
Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy: Module 11:  Integrative Therapy, Clip C (Challenging Clients with a “Hunch”)
A. Identify 8–10 interviewing-type questions you would want to ask the client.

 

1. And do you agree with what he or she said?

Rationale: During the interview, the client mentioned that somebody told her she made poor choices; I want to ask this question to know how the client felt about this feedback.

 

2. What made you decide to give up?

Rationale: I would like to know the circumstances that made the client give up her relationship with that drug addict partner of her.

 

3. A very deep depression? How was that so?

Rationale: This question is meant to probe on the client’s experience which she described as a very deep depression.

 

4. How did you cope with that very deep depression experience of yours?

Rationale: I want to know exactly the mechanisms that the client employed to cope with the depression she went through by asking this question.

 

5. He was very angry? Do you mean he always gets angry?

Rationale: This question is meant to clarify the client’s statement to ensure that my understanding is similar with what she meant.

 

6. What do you mean when you said that your father is emotionally distant?

Rationale: This is to probe on her description of her father.

 

7. You have mentioned that your mother wasn’t very helpful. Could you cite instances, which made you conclude that your mother wasn’t really being very helpful to you?

 

Rationale: This is to probe on her description of her mother.

 

8. You have mentioned that you think of yourself as a rescuer? Does that have anything to do with your choice of getting involved with losers?

Rationale: This is to know the underlying reasons of the client’s choice of partners that are not good for her. It could help me, as a therapist, in assessing if her relationships with these men have anything to do with a past experience she is trying to avoid.

 

B. Identify two interviewing-type questions you would ask the client regarding their thoughts about harming self or others.

 

1. You have mentioned that you went through into a very deep depression after your relationship with that drug addict partner of yours. Was there ever a time within that period wherein you tried harming yourself?

Rationale: This is to know the client’s capability of inflicting self pain when in a depressive situation.

2. What about thoughts of harming yourself?

Rationale: In case the client says no to my first question, I would like to make a follow-up inquiry and ask her if she has ever experienced thinking of harming herself when she was into deep depression.

 

C. Identify four statements you would make to this particular client regarding ethics. You should specifically address confidentiality and dual relationships. The final two statements could focus on other potential ethical concerns that would be relevant to your client.

 

1. Before we will start this session, I would want to request you to consider me as a friend. You can tell me anything. You can share to me whatever it is that you can think of along the process and whatever it is that you are feeling. Can I Count on you with that matter?

 

Rationale: This is to let the client know that I, as a therapist, am not there to judge him. Rather, I’m there to help him and that is the message that I want to convey to him before the start of the session. Therapists need to communicate a caring, respectful, positive attitude that serves to affirm a client’s basic sense of worth (cited in Farber and Lane, 2002).

 

 

2. I also would want to assure you that whatever will transpire here will be kept confidential and will solely be used to help you.

 

Rationale: This is basically to assure the client that his secrets are safe with me as his therapist, and that all I care for his is wellness.

 

3. In addition, as part of the protocol, here is a written disclosure statement that you need to read on and accomplish, to let you know of our institution’s privacy policies.

 

Rationale: This is to educate the client of the privacy policies before the session starts. It is important to present this at the start of the interview to avoid making the client feel a sense of betrayal in case there’s a need to disclose the information being relayed to the therapist as required by law (cited in Glosoff, Herlihy, & Spence, 2000).

 

4. Along the process, we might become very good friends. Please don’t be offended if I would need to beg off sometimes on your requests, depending on the situation, as these are purely meant for your own good as a client, and not for anything else. I will do my best help you go through with whatever it is that you are into right now.

 

Rationale: This is basically intended to make the client feel that I am after for his welfare and that I am there to help him.

 

Reference:

 

Cormier, S., & Hackney, H. (2008). Counseling Strategies and Interventions (7th ed.). Boston MA: Allyn and Bacon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unit 7 – Assignment Worksheet
Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy: Module 6: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy, Clip D (Connecting Thoughts to Behavior/Feelings)
A. Identify 8–10 interviewing-type questions you would want to ask the client.

 

1. When did you start the feeling of not being able to discern thoughts with feelings?

Rationale: I want to know the history since during the interview; the client finds it indiscernible to segregate feelings with thoughts.

 

2. You want to care for yourself by accepting yourself right? How do you intend to start the process?

Rationale: As a therapist, I want to know if my client is certain on the steps she will be undertaking to realize her goal. If through the session, I will be able to identify that she isn’t certain how to do it or the steps aren’t the appropriate ones to do, then I will apply the necessary interventions to be of assistance.

 

3. What makes it a burden?

Rationale: This question is meant to probe on the client’s response with regards separating thoughts from feelings.

 

4. Would you want to share what makes it hurtful sometimes?

Rationale: This is again to probe on the client’s response.

 

5. You said this is a weight for you? What makes it very difficult on your part?

Rationale: This question is meant to know exactly the nature of the difficulties being described by the client.

 

6. Could you cite instances, which made you say that your feelings are so connected with your thoughts?

Rationale: This question is meant to trace the underlying cause of the client’s difficulty in separating thoughts from feelings.

 

7. Can you recall since when have you started feeling difficulty in separating your feelings from your thoughts?

 

Rationale: This is to probe on the client’s problem.

 

8. How long has it been with you?

Rationale: This is also another probing question to help me assess the client and to understand what her problem really is.

 

B. Identify two interviewing-type questions you would ask the client regarding their thoughts about harming self or others.

 

1. Was there ever a time wherein you tried harming yourself?

Rationale: This is to know the client’s capability of inflicting self pain when in a difficult situation.

2. What about thoughts of harming yourself?

Rationale: In case the response to my first question is a NO, I would like ask the client if she has ever experienced thinking of harming herself when she was in a difficult situation.

 

C. Identify four statements you would make to this particular client regarding ethics. You should specifically address confidentiality and dual relationships. The final two statements could focus on other potential ethical concerns that would be relevant to your client.

 

1. Before we will start this session, I would want to request you to consider me as a friend. You can tell me anything. You can share to me whatever it is that you can think of along the process and whatever it is that you are feeling. Can I Count on you with that matter?

 

Rationale: This is to let the client know that I, as a therapist, am not there to judge him. Rather, I’m there to help him and that is the message that I want to convey to him before the start of the session. Therapists need to communicate a caring, respectful, positive attitude that serves to affirm a client’s basic sense of worth (cited in Farber and Lane, 2002).

 

 

2. I also would want to assure you that whatever will transpire here will be kept confidential and will solely be used to help you.

 

Rationale: This is basically to assure the client that his secrets are safe with me as his therapist, and that all I care for his is wellness.

 

3. In addition, as part of the protocol, here is a written disclosure statement that you need to read on and accomplish, to let you know of our institution’s privacy policies.

 

Rationale: This is to educate the client of the privacy policies before the session starts. It is important to present this at the start of the interview to avoid making the client feel a sense of betrayal in case there’s a need to disclose the information being relayed to the therapist as required by law (cited in Glosoff, Herlihy, & Spence, 2000).

 

4. Along the process, we might become very good friends. Please don’t be offended if I would need to beg off sometimes on your requests, depending on the situation, as these are purely meant for your own good as a client, and not for anything else. I will do my best help you go through with whatever it is that you are into right now.

 

Rationale: This is basically intended to make the client feel that I am after for his welfare and that I am there to help him.

 

Reference:

 

Cormier, S., & Hackney, H. (2008). Counseling Strategies and Interventions (7th ed.). Boston MA: Allyn and Bacon

 

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