Alzheimer’s Disease

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Specific Purpose: To help my audience understand what Alzheimer’s Disease is. Thesis Statement: The need to educate people on Alzheimer’s Disease for family members or friends in-case a loved one is diagnosed. Introduction: A. What would one do if their family member or friend knew of someone who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease? What would they do to help or take care of this family member? Well, I work in a nursing home with the elderly with this disease every day.

It can be a challenge for the family member who may not understand, but with a little education on Alzheimer’s Disease, it can help the family member see the world through the patient’s eyes. B. This person could be a mother, father, or even a grand-parent or friend. C. Today, I would like to talk to you about, first, what Alzheimer’s Disease is and some statistics, second, the stages of Alzheimer’s Disease and what to expect, and finally, some safety precautions one can take around the home to keep their loved one safe.

II Body: (I’ll begin by telling you about Alzheimer’s Disease) A. People all over the country have been affected one way or the other by Alzheimer’s Disease. 1. I have realized that not everyone understands exactly how Alzheimer’s affects the brain and may have a hard time coping with their loved one. a. Alzheimer’s Disease is a progressive, degenerative disorder that attacks the brain’s nerve cells, or neurons, resulting in loss of memory, thinking and language skills, and behavioral changes. b. Statistics have shown, that it is estimated that as many as 5.

1 million Americans may have Alzheimer’s disease. And it usually affects people ages 65 or older. c. Clinicians can now diagnose Alzheimer’s disease with up to 90 percent accuracy. But this can only be done through autopsy. Lab tests, a physical exam, brain scans and neuro-psychological tests can be done to diagnose “probable” Alzheimer’s disease. (Now that you know what this disease is and some statistics, I can tell you all a little more about the stages of progression) B. Alzheimer’s disease progresses in stages over 8 to 10 years.

These stages are Mild, Moderate, and Severe Alzheimer’s Disease. a. Mild Alzheimer’s Disease includes memory loss, trouble naming items, getting lost easily, and may have personality changes. b. Moderate stages include poor memory recognition, trouble handling tasks, have a hard time dressing, may argue, be depressed, worried, and even wonder off. c. In the last stage, people with severe Alzheimers have problems eating, talking, and not recognizing family members. They must rely on caregivers to handle their most basic needs, such as holding their heads up to eat.

(As you can see, it is important to understand what Alzheimer’s Disease is, So now, let me give you some safety tips on caring for the Alzheimer’s patient) C. Finally, Alzheimer’s Disease can also be dangerous as far as safety. To keep your loved one safe in the home, there are several things that can be done. a. First, try to see the home through the patients eyes. Keep in mind that the Alzheimer patient perceives object and colors differently than we do. b. Make sure the home is free from clutter and other dangerous materials.

“Kiddie gates” should not be used, because they can’t hold an adults weight. c. Another safety pre-caution to take would be to always have a fire extinguisher and detector in the home. Fires can easily be started if pre-cautions are not taken. d. Food and beverages are also considered to be a safety hazard. Caregivers should watch for signs of weight loss and malnutrition. Alzheimer’s patients may forget to eat or stay hydrated III Conclusion: A. As you can see, knowing about Alzheimer’s Disease is important in-case anyone in your family is ever diagnosed.

B. I’ve told you what Alzheimer’s Disease is, and some statistics, second, the stages of Alzheimer’s Disease and what to expect, and finally, some safety precautions one can take around the home to keep their loved one safe. C. What if your loved one was diagnosed with this Disease? Imagine being the caregiver to this family member and or friend. It would be very beneficial and a relief to have some knowledge of Alzheimer’s Disease. D. Alzheimer’s Disease is an unfortunate disease that affects many geriatric patients.

Having this disease can be a challenge for both the patient and caregiver. Thank you for taking the time to listen to my speech on Alzheimer’s Disease. Works Cited Aronson. Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease: Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Disorders Association. New York: Macmillian Publishing Company, 1988. Print. Hodgson, H. The Alzheimer’s Caregiver: Dealing with the Realities of Dementia. Minneapolis: Chronimed Publishing, 1998. Print. Perke, Davis T. Caring for the Caregiver: A Guide to living With Alzheimer’s Disease. New York: Springer Publishing Company, 1994. Print. \

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy Specific Purpose: To help my audience understand what Alzheimer’s Disease is. Thesis Statement: The need to educate people on …

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy Introduction Loss of memory, forgetfulness, personal change, even death, are common related disorders caused by a disease called Dementia …

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy Alzheimer’s disease: A Silent Walk Alzheimer’s disease is a fairly common diagnosis for the elderly. Most often when an …

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy Thesis statement: Alzheimer’s disease changed the way my father perceived his world and the way I perceived my father. …

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy Thesis statement: Alzheimer’s disease changed the way my father perceived his world and the way I perceived my father. …

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy Alzheimer’s disease: A Silent Walk Alzheimer’s disease is a fairly common diagnosis for the elderly. Most often when an …

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