Alzheimers Disease

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Alzheimer’s disease is a “degenerative brain disease of unknown cause that is the most common form of dementia, that results in progressive memory loss, impaired thinking, disorientation, and changes in personality and mood, that leads in advanced cases to a profound decline in cognitive and physical functioning” (Merium-Webster dictionary). Alzheimer’s typically occurs in the geriatric population and affects an estimated one in eight people over the age of sixty-four (Arbesman &ump; Lieberman, 2011). Occupational therapy practitioners can help individuals who are diagnosed with this disease through many avenues.

Some of the goals of occupational therapy for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease are to create, restore, maintain, modify and prevent further deterioration of occupational performance (Schaber, 2010). The occupational therapy (OT) practitioner strives to address the specific needs of individuals with Alzheimer’s diseas… – – – – – – – – – – – – People with Alzheimer’s disease have impaired abilities due to the destruction of nerve cells in the brain (American Occupational Therapy Association, 2011).

Alzheimer’s disease is a “degenerative brain disease of unknown cause that is the most common form of dementia, that results in progressive memory loss, impaired thinking, disorientation, and changes in personality and mood, that leads in advanced cases to a profound decline in cognitive and physical functioning” (Merium-Webster dictionary). Alzheimer’s typically occurs in the geriatric population and affects an estimated one in eight people over the age of sixty-four (Arbesman &ump; Lieberman, 2011).

Occupational therapy practitioners can help individuals who are diagnosed with this disease through many avenues. Some of the goals of occupational therapy for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease are to create, restore, maintain, modify and prevent further deterioration of occupational performance (Schaber, 2010). The occupational therapy (OT) practitioner strives to address the specific needs of individuals with Alzheimer’s diseas… – – – – – – – – – – – – People with Alzheimer’s disease have impaired abilities due to the destruction of nerve cells in the brain (American Occupational Therapy.

Association, 2011). Alzheimer’s disease is a “degenerative brain disease of unknown cause that is the most common form of dementia, that results in progressive memory loss, impaired thinking, disorientation, and changes in personality and mood, that leads in advanced cases to a profound decline in cognitive and physical functioning” (Merium-Webster dictionary). Alzheimer’s typically occurs in the geriatric population and affects an estimated one in eight people over the age of sixty-four (Arbesman &ump; Lieberman, 2011).

Occupational therapy practitioners can help individuals who are diagnosed with this disease through many avenues. Some of the goals of occupational therapy for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease are to create, restore, maintain, modify and prevent further deterioration of occupational performance (Schaber, 2010). The occupational therapy (OT) practitioner strives to address the specific needs of individuals with Alzheimer’s diseas… upgraded members Upgrade to access full essay[->0] · ·Alzheimer’s disease, a neurodegenerative brain disease, is the most common cause of dementia.

It currently afflicts about 4 million Americans and is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States. Furthermore, Alzheimer’s disease is the leading cause of mental impairment in elderly people and accounts for a large percentage of admissions to assisted living homes, nursing homes, and other long-term care facilities. Psychotic symptoms, such as delusions and hallucinations, have been reported in a large proportion of patients with this disease. In fact, it is the presence of these psychotic symptoms can lead to early institutionalization.

Learning about Alzheimer’s disease and realizing that it is much more that just a loss of memory can benefit the families of those with the disorder as well as society as a whole. The purpose of this paper is to look at the disorder, as well as to discuss the history, symptoms, diagnosis and hopes of a cure for Alzheimer’s disease. Around the turn of the century, two kinds of dementia were defined by Emil Kraepin: senile and presenile. The presenile form was described more in detail by Alois Alzheimer as a progressive deterioration of intellect, memory and orientation.

As a neuropathologist, Alzheimer studied the case a 51 year-old woman. When she died, Alzheimer performed an autopsy and found that she had “cerebral atrophy” (deterioration of the brain), “senile plaques” (protein deposits) and “neurofibrillary tangles” (abnormal filaments in nerve cells) in her brain — three common pathological features of those who have Alzheimer’s Disease. Today, as research on Alzheimer’s disease progresses, scientists are describing other abnormal anatomical and chemical changes associated with the disease.

These include nerve cell degeneration in the brain’s nucleus and reduced levels of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine in the brains of Alzheimer’s disease victims. However, from a practical standpoint, conducting an… [continues][->1] ·Read full essay[->2] ·Cite This Essay APA (2005, 12). Alzheimers Disease Essay 10. StudyMode. com. Retrieved 12, 2005, from http://www. studymode. com/essays/Alzheimers-Disease-Essay-10-74948. html MLA CHICAGO Welcome Alzheimer’s Disease Symptoms & Stages On this page, you will find the following:

·Symptoms & Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease Memory Problems: Is It Alzheimer’s? Visit Your Doctor Symptoms & Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease Alzheimer’s disease usually progresses gradually, lasting from two to twenty years, with an average of seven years. Alzheimer’s is difficult to diagnose, so if you suspect that you or someone you know may have this neurological condtion, the first step is to see a doctor for a thorough medical exam. Alzheimer’s disease does not affect every patient in the same way.

The following stages represent the general course the disease follows, but moving from one stage to another may not be perceptable due to the fact that the symptoms are on a gradual continuum of severity. Pre-clinical/Pre-symptomatic Stage: Physical conditions connected to Alzheimer’s disease exist in a person’s body long before symptoms are evident. These conditions are normally defined through the use of “biomarker” tests, like those searching for beta-amyloid and tau proteins in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, and specialized PET and MRI scans.

Currently, this stage is only defined in research settings and clinical trials and is unlikely to be given as an official clinical diagnosis by a health professional. Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Due To Alzheimer’s Disease/Prodromal Stage: Recently, scientists have identified a condition between normal age-related memory loss and dementia called mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Individuals with MCI have persistent memory problems (for example, difficulty remembering names and following conversations and marked forgetfulness) but are able to perform routine activities without more than usual assistance.

MCI often leads to Alzheimer’s, but while all those who progress to some form of dementia go through a period of MCI, not all patients exhibiting MCI will develop Alzheimer’s disease. An official clinical diagnosis of MCI can be given by a health professional. Dementia Due To Alzheimer’s Disease (Mild, Moderate, Severe Stages): Mild (Stage 1) Early in the illness, people with Alzheimer’s tend to lose energy and spontaneity, though often no one notices anything unusual. They exhibit minor memory loss and mood swings and are slow to learn and react. After a while they start to shy away from anything new and prefer the familiar.

In this stage, Alzheimer’s patients can still perform basic tasks independently but may need assistance with more complicated activities. Speech and understanding become slower, and patients often lose their train of thought in midsentence. They may also get lost while traveling or forget to pay bills. As they become aware of this loss of control, they may become depressed, fearful, irritable, and restless. Moderate (Stage 2) Eventually, people with the illness begin to be disabled by it. Though the distant past may be recalled, recent events become difficult to remember.

Advancing Alzheimer’s affects the ability to comprehend location, the day, and the time. Caregivers must give clear instructions and repeat them often. As Alzheimer’s patients’ minds continue to slip away, they may invent words and not recognize formerly familiar faces. Severe (Stage 3) During the final stage, patients become more and more unresponsive. Memory becomes so poor that no one is recognizable. Patients lose bowel and bladder control and eventually need constant care. They lose the ability to chew and swallow and become bedridden and vulnerable to pneumonia, infection, and other illnesses.

Respiratory problems worsen, particularly when the patient becomes bedridden. This terminal stage eventually leads to coma and death. Back to top Memory Problems: Is It Alzheimer’s? Mild forgetfulness and memory delays Alzheimer’s Disease Symptoms & Stages On this page, you will find the following: ·Symptoms & Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease Memory Problems: Is It Alzheimer’s? Visit Your Doctor Symptoms & Stages of Alzheimer’s Disease Alzheimer’s disease usually progresses gradually, lasting from two to twenty years, with an average of seven years.

Alzheimer’s is difficult to diagnose, so if you suspect that you or someone you know may have this neurological condtion, the first step is to see a doctor for a thorough medical exam. Alzheimer’s disease does not affect every patient in the same way. The following stages represent the general course the disease follows, but moving from one stage to another may not be perceptable due to the fact that the symptoms are on a gradual continuum of severity. Pre-clinical/Pre-symptomatic Stage: Physical conditions connected to Alzheimer’s disease exist in a person’s body long before symptoms are evident.

These conditions are normally defined through the use of “biomarker” tests, like those searching for beta-amyloid and tau proteins in blood and cerebrospinal fluid, and specialized PET and MRI scans. Currently, this stage is only defined in research settings and clinical trials and is unlikely to be given as an official clinical diagnosis by a health professional. Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) Due To Alzheimer’s Disease/Prodromal Stage: Recently, scientists have identified a condition between normal age-related memory loss and dementia called mild cognitive impairment (MCI).

Individuals with MCI have persistent memory problems (for example, difficulty remembering names and following conversations and marked forgetfulness) but are able to perform routine activities without more than usual assistance. MCI often leads to Alzheimer’s, but while all those who progress to some form of dementia go through a period of MCI, not all patients exhibiting MCI will develop Alzheimer’s disease. An official clinical diagnosis of MCI can be given by a health professional. Dementia Due To Alzheimer’s Disease (Mild, Moderate, Severe Stages): Mild (Stage 1).

Early in the illness, people with Alzheimer’s tend to lose energy and spontaneity, though often no one notices anything unusual. They exhibit minor memory loss and mood swings and are slow to learn and react. After a while they start to shy away from anything new and prefer the familiar. In this stage, Alzheimer’s patients can still perform basic tasks independently but may need assistance with more complicated activities. Speech and understanding become slower, and patients often lose their train of thought in midsentence. They may also get lost while traveling or forget to pay bills.

As they become aware of this loss of control, they may become depressed, fearful, irritable, and restless. Moderate (Stage 2) Eventually, people with the illness begin to be disabled by it. Though the distant past may be recalled, recent events become difficult to remember. Advancing Alzheimer’s affects the ability to comprehend location, the day, and the time. Caregivers must give clear instructions and repeat them often. As Alzheimer’s patients’ minds continue to slip away, they may invent words and not recognize formerly familiar faces. Severe (Stage 3).

During the final stage, patients become more and more unresponsive. Memory becomes so poor that no one is recognizable. Patients lose bowel and bladder control and eventually need constant care. They lose the ability to chew and swallow and become bedridden and vulnerable to pneumonia, infection, and other illnesses. Respiratory problems worsen, particularly when the patient becomes bedridden. This terminal stage eventually leads to coma and death. Back to top Memory Problems: Is It Alzheimer’s? Mild forgetfulness and memory delays [->0] – /join. php [->1] – /join. php [->2] – /join. php.

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy Alzheimer is a disease that results from accumulation of beta-amyloid which is a type of protein normally found in …

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy -aka Dementia: a syndrome with progressive deterioration in intellectual functioning secondary to structural or functional changes. – Alzheimer’s disease …

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy -aka Dementia: a syndrome with progressive deterioration in intellectual functioning secondary to structural or functional changes. – Alzheimer’s disease …

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy Abstract The following paper focuses on Alzheimer’s disease, the disease which is a devastating brain disease and is one …

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy Introduction Loss of memory, forgetfulness, personal change, even death, are common related disorders caused by a disease called Dementia …

We use cookies to give you the best experience possible. By continuing we’ll assume you’re on board with our cookie policy Thesis statement: Alzheimer’s disease changed the way my father perceived his world and the way I perceived my father. …

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